Patrick Keating

Texas Trade Secrets

Category: NDAs (page 1 of 2)

Exit Interviews

Employee exit interviews are a useful tool for protecting businesses trade secrets.  Many businesses use exit interviews for a different purpose – eliciting candid answers from a former insider about what the business is doing right and wrong.  It is also a time to talk to the employee about trade secrets that may be at risk due to the employee’s departure.

Trade secrets may be at risk in two different ways.  The first risk is knowledge loss.  The second risk is inadvertent or intentional disclosure of trade secrets to a competitor. Continue reading

NDA Tolling Clauses

When using a non-disclosure agreement or non-use agreement (collectively, a “NDA”) to protect trade secrets, a good practice is to include a tolling clause in the contract to extend the life of the NDA if the restricted party breaches the contract. 

Imagine a plaintiff who files a theft of trade secrets claim against a defendant who continuously violates a NDA.  If the lawsuit takes several years to complete, the NDA might expire before the plaintiff obtains a judgment.  The defendant would then argue that the plaintiff is not entitled to an injunction prohibiting the defendant’s further use or disclosure of the trade secrets because the NDA expired.  After all the defendant asserts, “Regardless of whether I breached the NDA, I am entitled to use the trade secrets once the contractual restrictions expire.”

To avoid this situation, include language in a NDA stating that the term of the NDA will be extended for the amount of time that the restricted party breaches the contract.

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Employees Don’t Have to Sign Confidentiality Agreements

Although it is a good practice for employers to require their employees to sign confidentiality agreements covering trade secrets, failure to do so is not fatal to a theft of trade secrets claim.  This is because Texas law places a duty on employees not to use trade secret information acquired during the employment relationship.  No written confidentiality contract is required.  This duty survives termination of the employment relationship.

Do not assume employees are free to use their employer’s trade secrets just because there is no signed confidentiality agreement.

Here are two cases applying this rule of law: Lamont v. Vaquillas Energy Lopeno, Ltd., 421 S.W.3d 198, 211 (Tex. App.—San Antonio 2013, review denied); Reliant Hospital Partners, LLC v. Cornerstone Healthcare Group Holdings, Inc., 374 S.W.3d 488, 499 (Tex. App.—Dallas 2012, review denied).

Photograph pursuant to the license located at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode

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Avoiding Traps for the Unwary (Part One)

As we approach and move into a new year, I will write a few posts about common mistakes that can cause a loss of trade secret status.  The beginning of a new year is a good time to think about ways that we can do better and avoid mistakes.

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Expired NDA Damage Control

My last post discussed the “Catch 22” choice that trade secret owners in Texas face when deciding whether to make non-disclosure agreements (“NDAs”) last forever or expire on a specified date.  This post discusses damage control steps that a business can take when its trade secrets were disclosed under NDAs that are now expired.

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